http://topochange.cr.usgs.gov/landfills.php

Topographic change due to landfill operations has been observed based on some of the features delineated by the elevation differencing and thresholding process. The resulting altered landforms from landfills differ from other anthropogenic activities in that much of the deposited material is not rock and soil that had been previously excavated but man-made material that has been transported to the deposition site.

The figure below shows the Sunshine Canyon landfill in Sylmar, California, an example of topographic change due to landfill operations. The operation and expansion of this landfill continues to be a controversial topic in the local area. The close proximity of the landfill site to a major transportation artery is a reminder that visual impacts of human geomorphic activities can be significant.

Topographic surface change resulting from landfill operation (Sunshine Canyon landfill in Sylmar, California). The images are NED shaded relief (upper left), SRTM shaded relief (upper right), aerial photograph (lower left), and perspective view (lower right). Change polygons (blue = cut; red = fill) have been overlaid on each image. The arrow indicates the view direction (toward the southwest) for the perspective view.
Topographic surface change resulting from landfill operation (Sunshine Canyon landfill in Sylmar, California). The images are NED shaded relief (upper left), SRTM shaded relief (upper right), aerial photograph (lower left), and perspective view (lower right). Change polygons (blue = cut; red = fill) have been overlaid on each image. The arrow indicates the view direction (toward the southwest) for the perspective view.
The City of Los Angeles is releasing a Notice of Completion (NOC) for the Draft Program Environmental Impact Report (Draft PEIR) on the Solid Waste Integrated Resources Plan (SWIRP), also known as the Zero Waste Plan. The NOC is to inform the public that the SWIRP Draft PEIR has been completed and is ready for public comment from October 31, 2013 to December 20, 2013.

SWIRP is a long-range plan to meet the City’s solid waste management needs through 2030. The plan identifies various policies, programs, and facilities that will be needed to reach the City’s goal of 90% landfill diversion by 2025.
The attached NOC gives the details of public meetings, where the Draft PEIR is available, and where to submit written comments. It can also be accessed through www.lacity.org/san

We look forward to your participation during this public review period, and hope you join us at one of the scheduled meetings.

https://scl-cac.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/11/SWIRP-NOC-NOA-102513_final_updated_11.5.13.pdf

The Puente Hills Landfill will cease dumping on Oct. 31, 2013.
The Puente Hills Landfill will cease dumping on Oct. 31, 2013.

Puente Hills Landfill, the largest active landfill in the country, will close its doors. The permit for the site, which is near capacity, will expire after the close of business on Thursday.

“The landfill has been a solid, solid waste management facility since the 1950s,” said Chuck Boehmke, head of the solid waste management department for the Sanitation Districts of Los Angeles County. “It’s done a big part in keeping solid waste costs down.”

At its peak, the landfill Continue reading

THIS IS NOTICE that the Executive Officer intends to approve, as set forth in the attached draft letter, a liner design report (Report) for Cell CC-3B at the Landfill that was submitted to the Regional Board on July 9, 2013. Comments on this matter must be in writing, addressed to Dr. Wen Yang, Chief of the Land Disposal Unit, and received at the Regional Board Office by the close of business on August 19, 2013.

The Report provides the design and construction infmmation of an approximate 20-acre area within the permitted footprint of the Landfill, including design review, liner and leachate collection systems, geological conditions, slope stability, and surface water management.

Wayde Hunter
GHNNC Board Member / Vice Chair SCL-CAC

less_garbageCalifornians, for the seventh year in a row, are throwing away less and less garbage in landfills.

New statistics from the state Department of Resources Recycling and Recovery, also known as CalRecycle, shows that 29.3 million tons of trash were disposed statewide last year. That’s 4.3 pounds per day per person and a slight reduction from the 4.4 pounds per day per person in 2011 when 29.9 million tons were disposed. The population also increased from 37.4 million in 2011 to 37.7 million last year.

“Each incremental step in waste diversion puts the state closer to our goal of 75% recycling,” said CalRecycle Director Caroll Mortensen in a statement. “The public is doing its part by being conscious of what we throw out and thinking about recycling and reuse. We at CalRecycle will continue to do our part by supporting recycling businesses and other waste diversion infrastructure that create green jobs and help achieve our goal.”

Last year’s disposal decrease continues a downward trend started in 2005 when 42.5 million tons of waste were discarded, the state said.

The vast majority of waste, 99%, went to California landfills and about 1% was exported to out-of-state landfills, CalRecycle said.